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Category: Methodology

Steve Male Graphic for Tech Trends in 2021

Tech Trends We’re Following For 2021

2020 was a rollercoaster of a year, and it forced many companies of all sizes to pivot not only in terms of operations, but how they deliver products and services. Digital offerings have become the new norm, and many long-range innovation plans have experienced exponential growth due to increased demand and necessity.

One key takeaway from 2020: the collective need for the market research industry to revolutionize itself, and to bring research execution firmly into the 21st century. Now that 2021 is upon us, we’re highlighting 5 tech-driven trends that are poised to dominate the MR space this year:

  1. Continued reliance on Artificial Intelligence

We’ve been hearing about the impending arrival of AI for years, and how it will change everything in research. Conferences have seminars dedicated to it, and we’re inundated with webinars, articles and ads touting its importance. For the most part, it’s been more sizzle than steak, but we’re finally starting to see more practical applications being put to use.

AI-driven chatbots for qualitative exercises essentially fill the role of a moderator and can prompt respondents for further explanation based on the answers they provide. AI is also being used to mine historical responses and then extrapolate predictions based on past user behaviour. Early indicators point to a future of less reliance on proprietary ad hoc research and more reliance on historic secondary research, re-packaged for subsequent use.

2. The Internet of Things Plays a Central Role

As more and more people consume and integrate smart tech into their homes, the opportunity to leverage its use for practical research applications grows.  Smart home assistants like Google Assistant and Amazon’s Alexa have created an opportunity to engage consumers on a new level, providing an opportunity to subsidize current methodologies such as online and phone.

Smart tech also provides an opportunity to natively study usage behaviour from everything from lightbulbs to appliances.  The average U.S. homeowner has 11 connected smart devices in their home; look for this trend to grow throughout 2021, and with it the ability to leverage these IoT devices for key insights.

3. Usage of Tech to Supplement In-Person

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted in-person research and has forever changed the way we design and recruit for qualitative projects. 

Historically we’ve relied on physical locations to test grocery shelf layouts and to conduct shop-alongs, but the adoption of virtual and augmented reality technologies will allow consumers to take part in the equivalent research digitally from their home.  This will in turn allow for greater cost savings and open studies to a larger pool of individuals.

4. Blockchain

Blockchain presents far more possibilities to the research space than just the option to pay out participants in cryptocurrency. It offers the opportunity to build a secure global trust network that is verifiable through the creation of transactional transparency. Imagine a world in which panellists and data can be verified through blockchain technology, going far beyond a simplistic hashing system.

Larger companies such as IBM and Mastercard are currently implementing blockchain as a practical application to reduce fraud and security risk, and we expect similar practical usage in the MR space to grow as well.

5. Enhancing User Responses with 3rd Party Data

In addition to purchased syndicated data and social listening, another way to cut costs and time on fielding a study is to ask a core set of 15 to 20 questions, and then fill in the rest of the data using tie-ins from databases that already contain the answers.

As more and more data sources begin offering customized access to their data through APIs (Application Programming Interface), look for supporting data on studies to become more robust and the profiling and segmentation of respondents to become more granular as a result.

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted both the mental health and financial situations of a large minority of Canadians.

HALIFAX, November 5, 2020: In an ongoing effort to understand the impact of the global pandemic, Narrative Research has been asking Canadians about the impact they have experienced. The information in this release comes from two sources – the East Coast Voice online panel (including over 1,900 responses from Atlantic Canadians), and the Logit Group’s Omnibus panel (over 1,200 Canadians).

ECONOMIC IMPACTS

One-third of Canadians indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic has created economic or financial hardship for their household, with those in the Prairie Provinces and Ontario feeling the worst of it, compared with just two in ten in Quebec. The financial hit has been more acute for GenXers, Millennials and Gen Z, compared with Boomers, and not surprisingly, those with lower incomes are more likely to have been hit with financial hardship compared with those earning more.

Turning to Atlantic Canada in particular, one-third of residents indicate that they or someone in their household has applied for financial assistance programs such as Employment Insurance or emergency funding programs since the onset of COVID-19, marking an increase of 4 points since we last polled on this issue in April. Likelihood of having applied for assistance is lower in PEI compared with the other three provinces (26%, compared with 35% NL, 33% NS and 32% NB). Younger residents are by far more likely to have applied for assistance compared with older residents (49% aged 18 – 34, compared with 36% of those 35 – 54 and 23% of those 55+).

EMOTIONAL IMPACTS

Aside from the large financial impacts, the pandemic is clearly having an effect on Canadians’ mental health. Four-in-ten indicate they have experienced a major emotional or mental health hardship. Again, this sentiment is most acute in the Prairie Provinces and Ontario. By age, half of Millennials have experienced this type of hardship, compared with just three-in-ten Boomers. Those unemployed are most likely to have suffered emotionally during the pandemic.

Results shown are from a survey conducted online October 7-9, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older (972 decided adults), from the Logit Group’s Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Canadians to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.   

Additional Atlantic Canadian results are derived from an online survey conducted from September 24-29, 2020, with 1,911 Atlantic Canadians, 18 years of age or older, from Narrative Research’s online panel, East Coast Voice. This sample included responses from each Atlantic province (NB: 571; NS: 914; NL: 288; PE: 138). Using data from the 2016 Census, the results were weighted by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province.

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca

OR

Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services. 

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented. 

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

Extending Your CATI Reach

In the vast and varied world of market research data collection, one of the most time tested methods of administering surveys is with live agents over the phone, also known by the acronym CATI (Computer Aided Telephone Interviewing). Before the rise of the smart phone, targeting and interviewing random representative samples of respondents in the geography of your choice was relatively easy to do.

As we all know, the only thing that remains the same is the consistency of change.  As Americans transitioned to cell phones, and later, internet connected smart phones, the CATI playing field experienced significant changes. Things became a bit more complicated for researchers. Unscrupulous telemarketers inundated consumers and businesses alike with irritating calls day and night resulting in declining response rates. New laws were passed to regulate the use of automated dialers to contact cell phones.  With phone number portability, easy geographic targeting of phone lists via the North American Numbering Plan, was no longer dependable. The task of accurate sampling grew more complicated and costs were on the rise.

Fortunately, internet based respondent panels arrived to help fill the void, providing an inexpensive alternative to telephone survey research. Although cost effective, online panel had limitations too, particularly when targeting a tight geography, a low incidence audience, or an under-represented population. Often in such circumstances, feasibility became an issue.

New technology may provide the answer to this dilemma. New to the scene, platforms such as Logit’s Mobile360 allow SMS-to-web interviewing as an alternative, providing cost effective access to respondents via phone contact lists. Using this approach, cell phone respondents are invited to an online survey via TCPA compliant SMS invitations. This novel approach offers the comparative benefits and flexibility of sampling via random or listed contact numbers.

As an example of the powerful new options an SMS approach brings to the table, Logit’s Mobile360 platform allows for surveys to be deployed in a multimodal context with SMS-to-web fielding in conjunction with live agent CATI and/or internet panel. Quotas can be set and managed by contact method and invitations can be customized according to list information. If panel is being utilized, IP controls will screen out duplicate respondents before they enter the survey.

For B2B projects requiring a high degree of respondent verification, live dialing can be used for prescreening and validation, with a survey link then being delivered real-time. Such an approach can also be used as a method of screening for more involved respondent exercises such as MaxDiff, Conjoint, or Online Bulletin Boards.

As we see, when paired with new interviewing options available via SMS-to-web, CATI interviewing is often the most viable approach to solving your data collection challenges. If you have not yet explored hybrid contact strategies, perhaps it is time to take a deeper look.

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Chris Connolly Headshot

Chris is persistently focused on providing superior value and experience for each client relationship. With over 20 years of industry experience serving in leadership roles for both technical groups and project management teams, he has a proven track record of success.

Unmasking Qualitative Interviewing

The Covid-19 pandemic has now been with us for over half a year and looks likely to affect everyone, both personally and professionally, well into 2021. Without question, the corona virus has been an uber-disrupter forcing changes in just about every industry one can think of. When looking at the pandemic through the lens of the insights industry, for obvious reasons, one of the most affected areas of practice has been qualitative research. Even before the pandemic hit, virtual approaches to qualitative fieldwork had been growing in prevalence.

With the adoption of digital now being almost complete within our society, researchers can readily find respondents from previously out-of-reach demographic groups. Previously off-grid older aged, rural, and/or lower income individuals are now connected and comfortable having conversations via digital interfaces. This has afforded researchers faster and cheaper options for qualitative fieldwork. Gone are the days when everyone needed to invest the time and expense of traveling to a facility for face-to-face sessions. With the new logistical and ethical concerns brought into play during this Covid Age, the use of online qualitative platforms has only grown.

Along-side our clients, The Logit group has navigated the new qualitative fieldwork landscape. We’d like to take a moment to bring to your attention to some of the platforms used for virtual IDIs and focus groups coming into play commonly on our joint qualitative initiatives. Although not a comprehensive list, what follows is a summary of platforms we’ve grown familiar to.

Zoom – This is the cheapest and most readily accessible option currently out there for researchers. Zoom can be easily deployed to geographically dispersed individuals via computer, tablet, or mobile device. To make respondent scheduling simple, Zoom offers streamlined calendaring, allowing the user to schedule or start meetings from Outlook, Gmail, or iCal. Further, Zoom offers secure recording of sessions and supports the sharing of HD audio and video. Given the broad use of Zoom, many respondents are quite familiar with the interface which reduces the chance technical frustrations as part of the respondent experience.

FocusVision – InterVu – This platform enables live online focus groups or webcam interviews using two-way audio and video. Groups can accommodate up to 8 respondents plus the moderator. The platform includes the option of a remote ‘backroom’ for observers and clients. Those in the backroom are able to chat with the moderator and register time stamps synced to the recording which can speed analysis after sessions are complete. A unique feature offered by InterVu is facial recognition software intended to identify ‘professional respondents’.

20/20 Research – QualMeeting – Providing researchers the ability to conduct “face-to-face research” with participants from anywhere in the world, QualMeeting pairs web-cam technology and video streaming with a number of proprietary tools for specialized analysis. The platform can support customizable designs for stimuli and screen sharing. Also, the proprietary video portal provides the capability of creating searchable transcripts that link seamlessly to the related clips.

Logit Go – As a fully integrated turnkey qualitative solution, Logit GO, provides a flash-free video solution built for market research interviews with extensive white labeling/branding capabilities. Researchers can conduct In Depth Interviews (IDI’s) or connect with up to 8 participants simultaneously while client observers can discuss the group and provide feedback to the moderator privately from the group discussion. The platform is conveniently accessible and possesses robust browser support. Additionally, moderators can deploy an intuitive screen-share feature which allows respondents to share their online activities quickly and easily. For added convenience, the GO 2.0 Board video recorder features automated audio quality checks. GO 2.0 also offers improvements to the video tagging and clipping interfaces, allowing the user to efficiently create highlight reels from video collected from any source.

Important to note, aside from Zoom, each of the aforementioned platforms provide live support to help respondents get connected and navigate tech glitches, giving moderators the freedom to remain attentive the conversation.

As insights teams execute qualitative fieldwork while navigating a playing field where face-to-face in-person interviewing continues to present difficulties, we see yet again, technology has a way of filling the void and presenting new opportunities to make our work efficient, accurate, and cost effective.

When considering your next qualitative research project, rest assured that The Logit Team understands the tools of the trade and has the experience to help you execute effortlessly.

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About Chris Connolly, VP Research Services

Chris Connolly Headshot
Chris is persistently focused on providing superior value and experience for each client relationship. With over 20 years of industry experience serving in leadership roles for both technical groups and project management teams, he has a proven track record of success.

The Importance of Validating Online Voter Respondents

With a little less than a month until the 2020 US presidential election, political polling is in full swing across the country. Phone centers are at or near capacity trying to keep up with political polling demand, and online panel sources are being utilized at a higher frequency for political polling than ever before.

Traditionally pollsters have preferred a phone approach as it allows for a more representative sample base. The abundance of voter profiled phone sample has also made it the preferred methodology for targeting and applying quotas for party registration and previous voter history.

Over the past several years phone has become a more complicated landscape to navigate with increasing regulations and guidelines for how polling is conducted over the phone. In combination with declining response rates, online has now become the preferred method of polling for many.
Online presents a cost-effective alternative to phone, with an abundance of willing participants eager to provide their political opinions. The question is, how accurate are these opinions and how can researchers be assured that those they are speaking to are registered voters with a verifiable voting track record.

In the absence of voter registration data, self-identification has been the preferred method of panelist classification, leading to an inflated number on online research panels. In 2018 there were 153 million+ Americans registered to vote, working out to roughly 47% of the population. By contrast, in a recent poll of online panel members, over 70% had identified themselves as registered voters. In addition to an over inflated voter base, online has traditionally lacked the same segmentation afforded to phone sample. Political party affiliation and previous voter turnout are also self-identified and as such are open to over inflation and bias based on the survey instrument.

Thankfully, several 3rd party voter databases exist that will allow you to proactively match your sample and enhance your panelists voter profile. With the addition of appended voter history and partisanship you can control survey quotas and accurately target registered voters.
Enhancing panelist data with registered voter data creates a methodology truer in form to phone polling and gives you greater confidence in standing behind your online voter respondents data.


About Steve Male, VP Business Development

Portrait of Steve Male VP Business Development at the Logit Group

Steve has over 10 years of market research experience having held roles in project management, field services and client facing roles. Some of Steve’s core areas of focus include the multicultural markets and IT decision makers.

Top 5 Emerging Tech Trends in Market Research

It’s hard to believe that there was once a time when research was collected using a pen and paper. The last 10 years have seen the research space evolve at breakneck speed, largely thanks to improvements in technology and the way in which we store and access data.

Emerging tech has spawned new companies, methodologies and ways of collecting and reporting on insights, in turn forcing companies within market research to collectively look at ways to improve their own research practices.

Leveraging technology has made research more economical and has allowed us to expand the scope and magnitude in which insights are collected and analyzed. As a result, the playing field has been levelled with the introduction of DIY tools and other data driven products and services.
The question then becomes, what’s next? Where does research evolve from here and what do we need to do as an industry to be ready for its arrival. In this article we’ll look at the top 5 emerging tech trends that you need to be on the lookout for.

Blockchain
When most of us think of blockchain we think of cryptocurrency, and while it’s been its biggest implementation to date, blockchain presents far more possibilities to the research space then just the option to pay out participants in bitcoin.

Blockchain is about building a secure global trust network that is verifiable through the creation of transactional transparency. Imagine a world in which panelists and data can be verified through blockchain technology, going far beyond a simplistic hashing system.

Although practical usage in MR is quite limited at the moment, larger companies such as IBM and Mastercard are currently implementing blockchain as a practical application to reduce fraud and security risk.

Artificial Intelligence
Out of all of the items on this list, AI has gotten the most traction to date. It feels like almost every MR article and webinar has at least one reference to the subject. From AI based moderators to automated analytics and reporting, almost every aspect of a product lifecycle has received automation in some form or another.

The benefit of using AI is that it leverages the knowledge and data of countless other outcomes while at the same time reducing manual interaction and time spent on a project.

The good news about AI is that it’s becoming cheaper and more intelligent by the day, and with large companies like Tesla and Amazon leading the charge, it’s only a matter of time before automated projects become the norm as opposed to the exception.

Internet of Things
It’s becoming rarer and rarer to find a home that doesn’t include at least one smart product. Almost 70% of US homes now have at least one smart device, and of those, 60% either have at least a second device or would be open to purchasing additional devices.

Smart homes bring smart opportunities and provide additional avenues for both passive and interactive data collection. With it come the challenges and questions of how do we design questionnaires to be used with smart home voice assistants? What are the privacy concerns and restrictions of data monitoring and collection?

It’s hard to imagine, but there may come a time in the future where we no longer have to ask a consumer what they purchased at the grocery store. Their smart fridge will natively share that information with us, providing real time, detailed, accurate information.

Hybrid Methodologies
Methodology used to and still does to an extent play a critical role in how we engage with audiences for the purposes of research. However, as time goes on, the line between methodologies have blurred as audiences have adopted new means of communication.

SMS, social media and voice assistants have replaced land lines, faxes and mail as modern day information conduits. As a result, MR has had to adapt and find ways to utilize these channels to reach modern day consumers.

As we look to the future, the question is going to be how to we further leverage these opportunities and create sustainable products and services that incorporate these channels.

Non-MR Trends
The last MR trend is not an MR trend at all yet. It’s being utilized in another industry that has absolutely nothing to do with market research. It’s important now more so than ever to keep a watchful eye on other industries, looking for new ideas and inspiration that will serve as the innovation for creating the next wave of MR tech trends.



About Steve

Portrait of Steve Male VP Business Development at the Logit Group

Steve has over 10 years of market research experience having held roles in project management, field services and client facing roles. Some of Steve’s core areas of focus include the multicultural markets and IT decision makers.

The pandemic has given many Canadians the opportunity to slow down the pace and enjoy personal and family time.

The pandemic has given many Canadians the opportunity to slow down the pace and enjoy personal and family time.
July 28, 2020
While there have been many negative consequences of the overall pandemic experience, there are some positive outcomes that most Canadians have experienced during this period of time.
With home isolation and social distancing in place, most Canadian residents have been afforded the opportunity to undertake activities to a greater extent than is the case during their normal routine. Indeed, during the pandemic most have relaxed more than usual, spent more quality time with family members, baked/cooked more than usual, or read more than usual. Close to half indicated that they have slept more than usual, while one-third have exercised more than they normally would. Three in ten Canadians report having developed a new friendship or deepened an existing friendship during the pandemic.

Across the country, results are generally consistent, regardless of province or gender. There are, however, some interesting differences by age. Gen Z residents are notably more likely than other Canadians to have spent quality time with friends (78%), relaxed more (79%), slept more (78%) and to have exercised more (56%). The likelihood of having baked / cooked more often is most prevalent among those under the age of 35, while those aged 25-34 are most likely to have read more (60%) during the pandemic.
This survey was conducted online July 9-11, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielded monthly, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Canadians to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.
Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.
The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

 
Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup
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For more information, please contact:
Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Canadians support making the wearing of masks mandatory in public places in their province.

The vast majority of Canadians support making the wearing of masks mandatory in public places in their province, to help contain the COVID-19 virus.
July 20, 2020
When asked to what extent Canadians support or oppose making the wearing of masks mandatory in public places, findings indicate there is clear support for the use of masks in efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19. Indeed, more than eight in ten Canadian residents (83%) indicate some degree of support, with most voicing complete support. Only one in ten (12%) express any opposition to the idea.
Across the country, there is a high degree of consistency in this view, although residents of Ontario and Quebec are most likely to express complete support for this concept. In contrast, support is less pronounced in Atlantic Canada with two in ten voicing some level of opposition to the idea. This is not surprising given the lower incidence of COVID-19 in that region.
Overall support for making mask-wearing mandatory is generally consistent regardless of age, gender or household income, although those aged 55yrs+ are most likely to voice complete support.
This survey was conducted online July 9-11, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Canadians to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.
Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.
The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.
Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup
###
For more information, please contact:
Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Re-shaping Our Face-to-Face Protocols

The past several months has been a trying and disruptive period, both for our industry and the world.  As the curve starts to level, more and more economic areas have begun the process of re-opening, marking both opportunities and challenges for us conducting in-person research.

Since March, many of us in the research world have closely monitored the recommendations of both our government and medical experts.  Social distancing, disinfecting processes and general greater sense of awareness in public places have become the new norms.  As consumers and research participants emerge from self-isolation into the new world, it’s important to balance our research needs with the safety and peace of mind of participants.

Our ‘COVID19 Omnibus’ showed us that a majority of participants recognize the importance of sharing their opinions at this critical time, and largely feel that now is an appropriate time to participate in research. As research leaders, it is our responsibility to ensure that appropriate quality control & safety measures can both still be implemented.

As we transition back from the lockdown, it’s important to take the following steps to ensure the health and well being of not only respondents but also supporting employees as it pertains to in-person research.

In-Person Facility Best Practices:

To ensure the safety of all individuals participating in research at in-person facilities, it’s important to ensure the following conditions are met:

  • Sanitize the equipment and furniture before each shift
  • Have respondents do a temperature check at check-in
  • Ensure that mask & sanitizing/washing stations are available for respondents & staff
  • Have respondents sign a travel & symptom waiver before entering the interviewing area
  • Ensure that desks / chairs follow Social Distancing rules – minimum 6 feet apart
  • Utilize floor signs as reminder of social distancing rules
  • Limit the number of participants in a room at any one time – with a staggered entry
  • Reconfigure facilities to ensure proper distancing between respondents & staff
  • Use an electronic sign in and sign out for the respondent
  • No hand-outs, all concepts / hand-outs will be presented electronically
  • Product will be served in individual self-serve units only
  • If utilizing HUTs after in-facility interview– sanitized product containers should be placed in carry out bags for respondents to take home.
  • For HUTs without in-facility interview – respondents should be pre-screened by telephone/on-line before being mailed/couriered the product to their home in a sanitized container.
  • If client viewing is required, a second room with monitors or virtual monitoring should be utilized.

In addition to the safety of respondents, it’s also important to consider the health and well being of employees supporting the research. The following should be used as best practices when conducting research in person.

Staff Best Practices:

  • Measure and report staff temperature before coming in for each shift
  • E-mail/text a daily travel & symptom waiver before coming in for their shift
  • Wear masks and gloves where possible, always while at the facility
  • Sanitize/wash hands frequently and after every interview
  • Always maintain social distancing rules – minimum 6 feet apart
  • Sanitize tablets / computers after each interview
  • For product test – materials (plates, cutlery etc.) are one time use only

The post COVID-19 world will be a vastly different one for in person interviewing.  However, by following some of the best practices above we can ensure that both respondents and staff are able to conduct in person research in a safe and secure environment.

 


About Aref Munshi

Aref Munshi  

As Vice President, Sales & Research Services for The Logit Group, Aref Munshi’s main responsibility is managing existing clients. In his current role, his main responsibilities include managing existing clients, where he is a client advocate and research problem solver; he has been providing qualitative and quantitative support services to clients across the healthcare, consumer & business industries. With over 30 years of data collection experience, Aref’s strength is his holistic market research skill set.

Communication is key: But how much is too much?

Without a doubt, one of the most important aspects of any project managers job is to keep clients informed about a project’s progress. Whether it’s programming questions, discoveries during testing, or issues encountered during field, it’s essential to keep clients in the loop so that they can make an informed decision. However, it’s equally important to understand when we cross the line from insightful questions to a perceived lack of preparation from our clients.
Every one of our clients is important and understanding that every project is significant goes a long way in building trust and confidence with them. Part of that trust and confidence comes from ensuring that clients are not needlessly stressing over project details that are outside their scope.
Following some guidelines for communication goes a long way and can set the project and client relationship up for success in the long run. Here are three key communication takeaways for ensuring a projects success:

Stick to a Schedule
At the outset of a project, come up with a schedule that works for both your client as well as your team. It’s a hard balance between quality and speed – do it right or do it fast? – delivering both is the new norm and it’s important to set everyone up for success by establishing timelines and expectations early in the process. Once the timeline has been established, work towards it by keep your team up to date and prompting clients for any materials needed.
Schedule Changes
As with many projects, there can be delays; be it on your end or the client’s. In any case, it is important to always include a buffer of 1-2 days. If you find yourself in a situation where that buffer has been used, inform your client and your team. Sometimes it’s possible to tell that there will be schedule changes once important deadlines have been missed. Determine next steps. When will outstanding deadlines be met? Will field time be reduced? Will the survey be shortened to reduce programming hours? Figuring out what needs to be modified will pave the way for a revised schedule. Communicate internally and let your client know the impacts of a schedule change.
ETAs
Like we established, things change. What is important is determining a rough schedule that outlines the time it will take to complete each stage of a project and most importantly, leave some buffer in the schedule. Letting clients know how long it will take to review their files, programming, field work, and any data/coding will take. Then also go a step beyond. If it becomes apparent programming will take longer, let clients know. Maybe the work they have sent over requires custom scripting that will take time to program and test. It is equally possible that an alternative solution is available and will take less time to program. Present timelines on both and allow your client to have the final word.


About Gurpreet Kaur

Gurpreet  Gurpreet is a graduate of Humber College’s Research Analyst program. She’s been in market research for 2 years. In her current role as Project Manager at Logit she primarily oversees quantitative tracker and ad hoc web based studies with a focus on sports, financial institutions and travel.