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Latest COVID-19 OMNI Results

How Canadians will socialize and entertain themselves in the coming weeks and months will clearly be impacted by the pandemic. Without a sustained period of no new COVID-19 cases in their province or a vaccine being available, Canadians are not willing to engage in several activities.

·  Canadians are most likely to visit friends inside a home or go for a haircut, if possible, in the coming weeks and months. In contrast, Canadians are least likely to go to a pub/bar, visit a spa, or visit a casino.

·   Having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province increases Canadians likelihood of undertaking certain activities in the coming months. Canadians are less certain what would increase their likelihood of undertaking activities in more intimate quarters, such as, casinos, spas, gyms, and bars/pubs.

May 28, 2020

LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING ACTIVITIES IN THE COMING WEEKS AND MONTHS

Given the impact COVID-19 has had on routine in-person activities, Canadians were asked their likelihood of undertaking a series of activities in the coming weeks and months, if possible. Results show that Canadians are most likely to visit friends inside a house (42%) or go for a haircut (42%), while slightly fewer Canadians indicated they would be likely to go shopping in a store other than for groceries or other necessitates (38%), and just under three in ten Canadians would eat in a restaurant (28%). Given the opportunity, Canadians would be less likely to go to the gym (19%), go to a pub/bar (13%), visit a spa (12%), or visit a casino (10%).  Indeed, a majority of Canadian residents are unlikely to undertake any of those four activities. (Note these results are among Canadian residents who did not say ‘Not applicable/I Don’t do that normally’.)

Likelihood of going for a haircut and eating in a restaurant increases with age, with Canadians over 55+ years showing higher likelihood. Boomers (aged 55+ years) also have a higher likelihood of visiting friends inside a home. Across regions, Canadians are fairly consistent in their opinions on likelihood of visiting friends inside a home. Meanwhile, Quebec and BC residents indicate a slightly higher likelihood of eating in a restaurant compared to their counterparts in other parts of the country. Additionally, BC residents also indicate a higher likelihood of visiting a spa or going to a bar/pub.

WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING ACTIVITIES

Canadians with a low likelihood of undertaking these eight activities were asked what would make them more likely to do so. Results show that there is some uncertainty around what would make them feel comfortable partaking in activities in close quarters. However, having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province is of high importance. Nearly forty percent of those with a low likelihood of visiting friends inside a home indicate having no new cases of COVID-19 would increase their likelihood (39%).  Roughly three in ten Canadian residents with a low likelihood indicate the same for eating in a restaurant (31%) and going shopping (28%). Less than one-quarter of residents indicate the same for going for a haircut (22%). Two in ten Canadians with a low likelihood of going to the gym would require having a vaccine available (20%) to increase their likelihood of that activity. Additionally, the highest levels of uncertainty are around visiting a casino (29%), visiting a spa (28%), going to a bar/pub (26%), and going to the gym (20%).

Across regions there is widespread agreement that having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province will increase their likelihood of undertaking several activities. This is especially true among BC residents who are more likely to indicate this for activities such as going to the gym, going shopping, going to a bar/pub, and eating in a restaurant.

Watch for further details on Canadians’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This survey was conducted online from May 13 to May 15, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every two weeks, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys sample Canadians to ask about their opinions and behaviours related to the pandemic. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

Narrative Research, (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned, research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

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For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

COVID-19 OMNI Wave 2 Results

In the coming weeks and months Canadians are unlikely to undertake activities beyond their job or a health-care visit, unless there is a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province or a vaccine being available.

  • Canadians are most likely to return to work, if possible, in the coming weeks and months. In contrast, Canadians are least likely to take a flight or send their children to daycare.
  • Although there is some uncertainty around what it would take for Canadians to be more likely to undertake certain activities in the coming months, having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province is an overall theme of importance, along with a vaccine becoming available.

May 26, 2020

LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING ACTIVITIES IN THE COMING WEEKS AND MONTHS
Given the impact COVID-19 has had on routine in-person activities, Canadians were asked their likelihood of undertaking a series of activities in the coming weeks and months, if possible. Results show that Canadian residents are most likely to return to work (51%), while one-third of Canadians indicated they would be likely to visit the dentist for a routine cleaning/procedure (33%), and two in ten Canadians would visit a physiotherapist/ chiropractor (21%). Canadians indicated that given the opportunity, they would be less likely to send children to school (15%) or take a taxi/Uber/Lyft (15%), take a flight (13%), or send children to daycare (12%).  Indeed, the majority of Canadian residents are unlikely to undertake any of those four activities.

Perhaps not surprisingly, likelihood of undertaking a health-related visit increases with age. Indeed, those 35 years of age or over are slightly more likely to indicate in the coming weeks and months that they would visit the dentist or a physiotherapist/chiropractor. Across regions, Canadians are fairly

consistent in their opinions on likelihood of undertaking activities. Interestingly, BC and Ontario residents indicate a lower likelihood of returning to work compared to their counterparts in other parts of the country.

WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO MAKE UNDERTAKING ACTIVITIES MORE LIKELY

Canadians with a low likelihood of undertaking any of these seven activities were asked what would make them more likely to do so. Results show that there is some uncertainty around what it would take to have them feel comfortable, but it will be crucial to have a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province, and in some cases having a vaccine available. Thirty percent of those with a low likelihood of sending their children to school indicate having no new cases of COVID-19 would increase their likelihood of sending their children to school. Roughly one-quarter of Canadian residents with a low likelihood indicate the same for going to work (23%) and visiting the dentist (25%), and slightly fewer residents indicate the same for sending their child to daycare (21%), taking a taxi/Uber/Lyft (19%), and visiting a physiotherapist/chiropractor (19%). Four in ten Canadians with a low likelihood of taking a flight would require having a vaccine available (39%) to increase their likelihood of that activity. Additionally, the highest levels of uncertainty concern taking a taxi/Uber/Lyft (29%), sending children to daycare (25%), and visiting a physiotherapist/chiropractor (24%).

Across regions there is widespread agreement that having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their province will increase their likelihood of undertaking certain activities. Atlantic Canadians and those aged 18-24 are more likely to indicate having a vaccine available will increase their likelihood of taking a flight, compared to their counterparts.

This is the first of two research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Canadians’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This survey was conducted online from May 13 to 15, 2020, with 1,231 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every two weeks, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys sample Canadians to ask about their opinions and behaviours related to the pandemic. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

Narrative Research, (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned, research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

### 

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066 (M), mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca,
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048 (M), mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116 (M), sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Weathering COVID-19 – Business Development Strategy During a Difficult Time

I often thought the world would be a much better place if all politicians were, by law, required to have a history degree. The relevant knowledge and trends they could draw from to help shape insights, process and a successful path forward would really serve us all. As researchers, this is language that’s all too familiar to us…

With Covid-19, we’re in an unprecedented time, but we are uniquely qualified to handle this challenge.

With a growing trend towards sensationalized data and soundbites, we as a society are constantly inundated by main stream media with sobering assessments and un-fact checked hypotheses that drive fear and further enflame the situation. Covid-19 has become commoditized, making it easy to get caught up in the vortex around the pandemic. It’s important to understand that in these times, the best way to thrive is to think outside the box and to adopt a fresh perspective.

We need to focus on what we can control in an environment that has taken so much of it away. It’s difficult to develop business while managing our own personal feelings and worry for our families and colleagues, but we’re objective thinkers. We make decisions and recommend directions based on market conditions. We need to employ this thinking for ourselves and understand that there are growth areas, and in fact, it’s never been more important and a better time to conduct most lines of research.

The New York Times recently published this article that portrays the realities we’re seeing in field:

The Title:
Surprising Poll Results: People Are Now Happy to Pick Up the Phone

The Subtitle:
Pollsters are used to having their calls screened. But when everyone is stuck at home, a stranger with some survey questions can be a lifeline.

https://bit.ly/polling-coronavirus

The article focuses on the realities we’re finding on how ‘response rates have risen amongst people in typically tough-to-reach demographics, such as young people and those without college degrees, who are typically less likely to use landlines. Increased participation is also reported amongst cell phone users – particularly in the daytime, when in the past many respondents would most likely have been at work and unwilling to answer a call from an unknown number.’

The striking tone of the article and as those in CATI data collection research know, traditionally, older age groups take more time and are more receptive to research, more so than any other age group. With Covid-19 in our midst, we’re seeing increased cooperation across the board across all ages and ethnic groups. It’s incumbent on us to take the responsibility to continue research outreach and to help the population right itself. This example of an empowering reality can mobilize a lot of business decision makers into quick action. The question we all hear posed by Decision Makers is… ‘Is this the right time to do research?’ Yes in fact, it is.

Increased response rates are being reported across the board and span over all methodologies. Online survey response rates have surged, interactive IDI/Focus Groups are becoming the new norm and plans for onsite social distancing compliance for research are well underway and gathering momentum.

As business leaders, it’s our job to approach the emotional toll of a terrible pandemic in a clinical fashion as we’re revenue drivers. We acknowledge it’s our responsibility to create stability to ensure the health and growth of our clients. It’s also important for those who work for our Companies. It can feel heavy but I have found that shifting my focus to the emotional business needs of our clients has been helpful and very productive.

In times like this, we trust ourselves, trust the future and take charge of what we can control. Now, more than ever, it’s important to create a ‘diamond’ level experience routed in creativity and case examples that truly illustrate the state of the industry which is driven by respondents. Tasking yourself to this challenge will serve not only you, but us collectively as an industry well.

 


About John Wulff

John’s 25 year career has been focused on quantitative market research data collection. Holding senior positions representing some of the largest and best quantitative Online & Offline data collection companies with operations based in North & Central America and Asia.

COVID-19 Omnibus Wave 1 Results

Canadians recognize the importance of sharing their opinions at this crucial time, and largely feel now is an appropriate time to participate in research.

The results from our first #COVID19 Omnibus are in. Click the link below to see the full results. This is the first of four research summaries that will be provided within the next two weeks.  Watch for further details on Canadians’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19

#pandemic. In partnership with Narrative Research, the research was conducted from April 16 to April 19, 2020, with 1,231 Canadians 18 years of age or older.

Read the full results here

COVID19results2

Interviewing Hard-to-Reach Respondents During Difficult Times

Interviewing Hard-to-Reach Respondents During Difficult Times
By Arundati Dandapani

Door to door sampling was the truest, recall the veterans, who are still grappling with the challenges of an industry that has fast moved towards automation and programmatic designs. Research reveals that operational efficiency and costs have brought down the overall quality of the respondent experience, leading to a general distrust in the industry. Poor experiences have led to declining participation rates, leading to even lower response and completion rates.

Incidence rate is defined as the number or percentage of qualified people from a sample that are eligible to participate in a study. Since the onset of one of the most disruptive global health crisis in recent decades has changed the way we work, suppliers across the board report no change in IR (ease of finding qualified respondents/targetable population) or Response Rates (completion), and in some cases observing even higher response rates than before. Meeting respondents for specific market research studies however remains an ongoing challenge and difficulty for many reasons.

Are these Difficult Times?

Twelve weeks ago, there was no COVID-19 to talk about. Today, how we are doing business and market research has changed completely owing to the economic, social, and public health impacts of the current global pandemic.

“In times of COVID-19, we need to be hyper-sensitive on user experience as everyone has heightened emotions. When we poll our audience about ‘what questions do you have today’, Covid related questions are becoming major top of mind questions,” said Paul Neto of Measure Protocol. Rand Market Research confirms that nearly 80% of Canadians are concerned about the Coronavirus and are changing their behaviour due to it. “While many companies focus on Incidence Rates, the critical metric is its conversion to completion rates, as in many cases (70-90% of all surveys), participants do not complete them because of poor experiences. The industry has moved away from responsible interaction with the participant,” reminded Neto.

Jackie Lorch of Dynata wrote that, “Consumers can still provide generalizable data and think objectively about their cars, TVs, household goods and other products and services, but their answers on many topics will be different while the Coronavirus crisis lasts. This reflects the reality of your customers’ experience. It is more vital than ever to keep in touch with them and not risk being left with a data “black hole” as the world recovers.”

Business as Usual Despite the Crisis

The major reported or observed change in research operations has been in the shifting of real-person fieldwork to virtual operations, affecting offline qualitative work the most (including face-to-face interviews, and focus groups). The best way to measure change is by tracking respondents over time, for example, comparing the IR in studies in the last month with the past three months of studies in field.

Whether times are good or bad, maintaining respondent interest can be a challenge for many reasons. Factors range from the source of sample (e.g., banks that use highly targeted client lists for surveys seeing higher participation), mode of survey (online is a better medium for some demographics, and has little barriers for use in difficult times like COVID-19), quality of profilers (the rarer the qualifications or behaviours, the feasibility of that sample is lower) among others.

While there are different reasons for low respondent participation, panel participation is often dependent on how the survey question is worded, and what the qualification times and windows are. Qualification includes the criteria that respondents are required to fulfill at the recruiting stage, and qualification times and windows often determine how tracking studies will be impacted, opening unique opportunities to benchmark and observe targeted respondent behaviour over time.

The potential of mode must not be overlooked. According to Randa Bell of ASDE Survey Sampler, “IVR (interactive Voice Response) presents an interesting opportunity to reach respondents in a cheaper or faster way than traditional telephone surveys, when your interviewing capacity is lowered due to physical distancing in call centers. Also, there’s the added ability to reach cell phones via IVR or SMS text messages to the younger age groups who might be sitting at home and bored with all the news and lock-down. All surveys at these times should be introduced knowing that COVID-19 is on the minds of everyone and acknowledged in the introduction.”

Doing More to Earn Respondent Trust and Retention

Businesses need to keep conducting mitigation tests to check that their field studies are on track to optimize their incidence rates. The qualifications for studies and project timelines must reflect the new reality and new needs, whether that means keeping a close tab on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, and being adaptive in response as governments and citizens work to contain the outbreak, or introducing new measures that protect the public and companies investment in the ongoing health of their respondents.

Incidence rates are reflective of the effort it takes to convert qualified persons to participate in a study. Research fieldwork and data collection methods must be adaptive to create better experiences that improve participation rates. If that in the current environment means substituting / migrating all face-to-face qualitative work with other user-friendly virtual, mobile and safe alternatives, businesses must prepare. Targeting lists and respondents effectively involves employing the optimal mix of traditional and new technologies including AI, the internet of things and blockchain to ensure user-intuitive experiences that convert to the highest participation of qualified respondents.


About Arundati

Arundati Arundati Dandapani, CMRP (@itadnura) advises non-profits and businesses with insights and storytelling. She is the founder of Generation1.ca, an online cross-sectoral resource and outlet for Canada’s newest residents, chief editor of MRIA-ARIM, and has been honoured with industry awards like the inaugural GRIT Future List Honour along with the 2020 AAPOR Burns Bud Roper Fellow and QRCA’s 2020 Young Professionals Grant. She can be reached at arundati@generation1.ca.

COVID-19: Business Continuity

To all of our friends & colleagues,

In light of the current COVID-19 virus, we are carefully monitoring the situation by following national and global updates and implementing measures to ensure our employees’ well being, in addition to ensuring reliable business continuity.

We have not experienced any significant impact to our business operations to date. Our employees are based throughout North America and are equipped to work from a remote location. We are also working diligently to limit any potential impact to our clients and vendors.

Effective immediately we have implemented the following protocols:

•          Business travel restrictions until further notice

•          Leveraging virtual and/or teleconference meetings

•          Cancelling large group gatherings until further notice

•          Ensuring national Public Health agencies’ best practices are being followed at all of our offices (including call centers)

•          Secure technology in place for employees to work from home if necessary (including call centers)

Feel free to reach out to us with any questions.

Thank you,

Sam Pisani
Anthony Molinaro
Paul Molinaro
Managing Partners

The Logit Group