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Archive: June 23, 2020

Canadians are largely supportive of the anti-racism demonstrations taking place, and recognize that there is systemic racism in Canada.

Canadians are largely supportive of the anti-racism demonstrations taking place, and recognize that there is systemic racism in Canada.

  • The majority of Canadians support anti-racism demonstrations.
  • Two thirds indicate that there is systemic racism in Canada.
  • Fewer Canadians recognize racism as a serious problem in their province, and even fewer say racism is an issue in their workplace.
  • Over half of working Canadians know that their employer has a diversity policy in place.

June 22 2020

Three quarters of Canadians support anti-racism demonstrations, with a third completely supporting them. Support for these demonstrations is generally consistent across the country, though younger residents are the most likely to offer strong support. Interestingly, support is consistent, regardless of gender, ethnicity, income, education level or employment status.

Two thirds of Canadians believe there is systemic racism in Canada, however, while a majority of Canadians recognize that systemic racism exists in our country, fewer believe that racism is a serious problem in their own province, and very few believe that racism is a serious issue in their workplace.

“The discrepancy in recognition of racism at a national level, compared with individual provinces, could be masking the fact that racism and discrimination exist, but may not always be recognized in our own communities,” says Margaret Brigley, CEO of Narrative Research.

Just over half of working Canadians indicate their employer has a workplace diversity policy in place, but three-in-ten are unsure, and 16% say their workplace does not have one.

This survey was conducted online from June 10 – 11, 2020, with 1,231 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every two weeks, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys sample Canadians to ask about their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

Narrative Research, (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned, research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

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For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca

OR

Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca

OR

Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

 

 

 

 

Re-shaping Our Face-to-Face Protocols

The past several months has been a trying and disruptive period, both for our industry and the world.  As the curve starts to level, more and more economic areas have begun the process of re-opening, marking both opportunities and challenges for us conducting in-person research.

Since March, many of us in the research world have closely monitored the recommendations of both our government and medical experts.  Social distancing, disinfecting processes and general greater sense of awareness in public places have become the new norms.  As consumers and research participants emerge from self-isolation into the new world, it’s important to balance our research needs with the safety and peace of mind of participants.

Our ‘COVID19 Omnibus’ showed us that a majority of participants recognize the importance of sharing their opinions at this critical time, and largely feel that now is an appropriate time to participate in research. As research leaders, it is our responsibility to ensure that appropriate quality control & safety measures can both still be implemented.

As we transition back from the lockdown, it’s important to take the following steps to ensure the health and well being of not only respondents but also supporting employees as it pertains to in-person research.

In-Person Facility Best Practices:

To ensure the safety of all individuals participating in research at in-person facilities, it’s important to ensure the following conditions are met:

  • Sanitize the equipment and furniture before each shift
  • Have respondents do a temperature check at check-in
  • Ensure that mask & sanitizing/washing stations are available for respondents & staff
  • Have respondents sign a travel & symptom waiver before entering the interviewing area
  • Ensure that desks / chairs follow Social Distancing rules – minimum 6 feet apart
  • Utilize floor signs as reminder of social distancing rules
  • Limit the number of participants in a room at any one time – with a staggered entry
  • Reconfigure facilities to ensure proper distancing between respondents & staff
  • Use an electronic sign in and sign out for the respondent
  • No hand-outs, all concepts / hand-outs will be presented electronically
  • Product will be served in individual self-serve units only
  • If utilizing HUTs after in-facility interview– sanitized product containers should be placed in carry out bags for respondents to take home.
  • For HUTs without in-facility interview – respondents should be pre-screened by telephone/on-line before being mailed/couriered the product to their home in a sanitized container.
  • If client viewing is required, a second room with monitors or virtual monitoring should be utilized.

In addition to the safety of respondents, it’s also important to consider the health and well being of employees supporting the research. The following should be used as best practices when conducting research in person.

Staff Best Practices:

  • Measure and report staff temperature before coming in for each shift
  • E-mail/text a daily travel & symptom waiver before coming in for their shift
  • Wear masks and gloves where possible, always while at the facility
  • Sanitize/wash hands frequently and after every interview
  • Always maintain social distancing rules – minimum 6 feet apart
  • Sanitize tablets / computers after each interview
  • For product test – materials (plates, cutlery etc.) are one time use only

The post COVID-19 world will be a vastly different one for in person interviewing.  However, by following some of the best practices above we can ensure that both respondents and staff are able to conduct in person research in a safe and secure environment.

 


About Aref Munshi

Aref Munshi  

As Vice President, Sales & Research Services for The Logit Group, Aref Munshi’s main responsibility is managing existing clients. In his current role, his main responsibilities include managing existing clients, where he is a client advocate and research problem solver; he has been providing qualitative and quantitative support services to clients across the healthcare, consumer & business industries. With over 30 years of data collection experience, Aref’s strength is his holistic market research skill set.

Results from W3 of our COVID-19 OMNI

June 3, 2020: Canadians are generally comfortable with their province’s speed of re-opening businesses and services, though if anything, things are perceived as moving too quickly. During this process, residents are committed to ensuring safe practices in public spaces.

  • A majority of (59%) Canadian residents feel the speed of re-opening businesses/services in the country is just about right, while one-third (33%) indicate it’s too fast, and fewer than ten percent (8%) feel it’s too slow. Those in Ontario are more likely to feel businesses and services are opening too fast.
  • Despite the prolonged period of social distancing, as businesses and services start to reopen, Canadians are largely committed to continuing safe practices in public spaces, such as keeping six feet apart, refraining from entering anyone else’s home, and wearing a mask.

    SPEED OF RE-OPENING BUSINESSES/SERVICES

    Across the country, provinces are reopening businesses and services at different paces. To gauge the perceptions of this, Canadian residents were asked to describe the speed of re-opening in their province. Overall results indicate that six in ten Canadians believe the speed of reopening businesses and services is just about right (59%), while one third indicate society is re-opening too fast (33%), and fewer than ten percent believe things are re-opening too slowly (8%). Across regions, Ontario residents are more likely to indicate their province is opening too fast (41%), compared to their counterparts in other parts of the country. Across BC, the Prairies, Quebec, and Atlantic Canada, results are fairly consistent, with the majority of residents feeling the pace of re-opening is just about right. Looking specifically at provinces in Atlantic Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador shows widespread agreement that the pace of re-opening is just about right (80%).

    Interestingly, younger residents are more cautious, with Canadians under 34 years being more likely to believe their province is re-opening too rapidly, compared with their older counterparts.

    LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING PROTECTIVE MEASURES AS BUSINESSESS AND SERVICES RE-OPEN

    As businesses and services begin to re-open, Canadians were asked their likelihood of undertaking a series of social distancing measures. Results indicate that Canadians will continue to prioritize safety when outside of their home. Indeed, nearly all Canadians express some likelihood of staying at least six feet away from anyone, except those with whom they are permitted to socialize (96%). Additionally, the vast majority of Canadians will definitely or probably refrain from entering anyone else’s home except their own or those with whom they are permitted to socialize (86%). Canadians are less committed to wearing a mask in public, although three-quarters indicate they will definitely or probably do so. Most Canadians (60%) do not anticipate wearing gloves in public, as businesses and services re-open, although four in ten express some likelihood to do so. Although all regions show a high likelihood of undertaking three of the four measures, provinces with larger populations have a slightly higher willingness. Indeed, BC (80%), Ontario (79%), and Quebec (78%) residents expressed some likelihood that they will wear a mask in public as businesses and services reopen in their province. Additionally, Ontario residents are more inclined to indicate that they will definitely refrain from entering anyone else’s home except their own or those with whom they are permitted to socialize, as well as wear gloves in public.

    Likelihood of wearing gloves in public decreases with age, despite the elevated concern for older residents. Canadians under 35 years of age are also the most likely to wear a mask in public.

    Watch for further details on Canadians’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    This survey was conducted online from May 27 to 29, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every two weeks, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys sample Canadians to ask about their opinions and behaviours related to the pandemic. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a nonprobability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

    Narrative Research, (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is one of Canada’s leading public opinion and market research companies. As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned, research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

    The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

    Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup
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    For more information, please contact: Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
    OR
    Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
    OR
    Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Communication is key: But how much is too much?

Without a doubt, one of the most important aspects of any project managers job is to keep clients informed about a project’s progress. Whether it’s programming questions, discoveries during testing, or issues encountered during field, it’s essential to keep clients in the loop so that they can make an informed decision. However, it’s equally important to understand when we cross the line from insightful questions to a perceived lack of preparation from our clients.
Every one of our clients is important and understanding that every project is significant goes a long way in building trust and confidence with them. Part of that trust and confidence comes from ensuring that clients are not needlessly stressing over project details that are outside their scope.
Following some guidelines for communication goes a long way and can set the project and client relationship up for success in the long run. Here are three key communication takeaways for ensuring a projects success:

Stick to a Schedule
At the outset of a project, come up with a schedule that works for both your client as well as your team. It’s a hard balance between quality and speed – do it right or do it fast? – delivering both is the new norm and it’s important to set everyone up for success by establishing timelines and expectations early in the process. Once the timeline has been established, work towards it by keep your team up to date and prompting clients for any materials needed.
Schedule Changes
As with many projects, there can be delays; be it on your end or the client’s. In any case, it is important to always include a buffer of 1-2 days. If you find yourself in a situation where that buffer has been used, inform your client and your team. Sometimes it’s possible to tell that there will be schedule changes once important deadlines have been missed. Determine next steps. When will outstanding deadlines be met? Will field time be reduced? Will the survey be shortened to reduce programming hours? Figuring out what needs to be modified will pave the way for a revised schedule. Communicate internally and let your client know the impacts of a schedule change.
ETAs
Like we established, things change. What is important is determining a rough schedule that outlines the time it will take to complete each stage of a project and most importantly, leave some buffer in the schedule. Letting clients know how long it will take to review their files, programming, field work, and any data/coding will take. Then also go a step beyond. If it becomes apparent programming will take longer, let clients know. Maybe the work they have sent over requires custom scripting that will take time to program and test. It is equally possible that an alternative solution is available and will take less time to program. Present timelines on both and allow your client to have the final word.


About Gurpreet Kaur

Gurpreet  Gurpreet is a graduate of Humber College’s Research Analyst program. She’s been in market research for 2 years. In her current role as Project Manager at Logit she primarily oversees quantitative tracker and ad hoc web based studies with a focus on sports, financial institutions and travel.