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Category: Media

Canadians’ Preference In The Us Presidential Election

  • Among Canadian adults, there is overwhelming support for Joe Biden in the upcoming American presidential election.
  • At least three-quarters of Canadians in each of the country’s five regions would prefer Biden.

October 23, 2020

CANADIANS’ PREFERENCE IN THE US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

There is massive support for Democrat Joe Biden among Canadian adults who express a preference in the upcoming US election. Eight-in-ten adults (79%) currently favour the former Democratic US Vice-President in the November 3rd US election, with incumbent Republican Donald Trump gaining the backing of only two-in-ten (20%). One percent of Canadians who offer an opinion on this question, support other options. Approximately 22 percent of Canadians say they would not vote, are undecided, or otherwise do not express an opinion.

This distribution of support is in marked contrast to national polls south of the border, which at the present time generally indicate a much closer race, although most surveys presently suggest Biden has greater support than Trump.

Regionally in Canada, Biden’s support is highest in Quebec (85%) and Atlantic Canada (84%), with slightly less backing in British Columbia (77%), the Prairie Provinces (76%), and Ontario (also 76%).

Other demographics indicate that Biden performs comparatively better among Baby Boomers (86%) and females (85%).

This survey was conducted online October 7-9, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older (972 decided adults), from the Logit Group’s Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Canadians to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.493-3830, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Unmasking Qualitative Interviewing

The Covid-19 pandemic has now been with us for over half a year and looks likely to affect everyone, both personally and professionally, well into 2021. Without question, the corona virus has been an uber-disrupter forcing changes in just about every industry one can think of. When looking at the pandemic through the lens of the insights industry, for obvious reasons, one of the most affected areas of practice has been qualitative research. Even before the pandemic hit, virtual approaches to qualitative fieldwork had been growing in prevalence.

With the adoption of digital now being almost complete within our society, researchers can readily find respondents from previously out-of-reach demographic groups. Previously off-grid older aged, rural, and/or lower income individuals are now connected and comfortable having conversations via digital interfaces. This has afforded researchers faster and cheaper options for qualitative fieldwork. Gone are the days when everyone needed to invest the time and expense of traveling to a facility for face-to-face sessions. With the new logistical and ethical concerns brought into play during this Covid Age, the use of online qualitative platforms has only grown.

Along-side our clients, The Logit group has navigated the new qualitative fieldwork landscape. We’d like to take a moment to bring to your attention to some of the platforms used for virtual IDIs and focus groups coming into play commonly on our joint qualitative initiatives. Although not a comprehensive list, what follows is a summary of platforms we’ve grown familiar to.

Zoom – This is the cheapest and most readily accessible option currently out there for researchers. Zoom can be easily deployed to geographically dispersed individuals via computer, tablet, or mobile device. To make respondent scheduling simple, Zoom offers streamlined calendaring, allowing the user to schedule or start meetings from Outlook, Gmail, or iCal. Further, Zoom offers secure recording of sessions and supports the sharing of HD audio and video. Given the broad use of Zoom, many respondents are quite familiar with the interface which reduces the chance technical frustrations as part of the respondent experience.

FocusVision – InterVu – This platform enables live online focus groups or webcam interviews using two-way audio and video. Groups can accommodate up to 8 respondents plus the moderator. The platform includes the option of a remote ‘backroom’ for observers and clients. Those in the backroom are able to chat with the moderator and register time stamps synced to the recording which can speed analysis after sessions are complete. A unique feature offered by InterVu is facial recognition software intended to identify ‘professional respondents’.

20/20 Research – QualMeeting – Providing researchers the ability to conduct “face-to-face research” with participants from anywhere in the world, QualMeeting pairs web-cam technology and video streaming with a number of proprietary tools for specialized analysis. The platform can support customizable designs for stimuli and screen sharing. Also, the proprietary video portal provides the capability of creating searchable transcripts that link seamlessly to the related clips.

Logit Go – As a fully integrated turnkey qualitative solution, Logit GO, provides a flash-free video solution built for market research interviews with extensive white labeling/branding capabilities. Researchers can conduct In Depth Interviews (IDI’s) or connect with up to 8 participants simultaneously while client observers can discuss the group and provide feedback to the moderator privately from the group discussion. The platform is conveniently accessible and possesses robust browser support. Additionally, moderators can deploy an intuitive screen-share feature which allows respondents to share their online activities quickly and easily. For added convenience, the GO 2.0 Board video recorder features automated audio quality checks. GO 2.0 also offers improvements to the video tagging and clipping interfaces, allowing the user to efficiently create highlight reels from video collected from any source.

Important to note, aside from Zoom, each of the aforementioned platforms provide live support to help respondents get connected and navigate tech glitches, giving moderators the freedom to remain attentive the conversation.

As insights teams execute qualitative fieldwork while navigating a playing field where face-to-face in-person interviewing continues to present difficulties, we see yet again, technology has a way of filling the void and presenting new opportunities to make our work efficient, accurate, and cost effective.

When considering your next qualitative research project, rest assured that The Logit Team understands the tools of the trade and has the experience to help you execute effortlessly.

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About Chris Connolly, VP Research Services

Chris Connolly Headshot
Chris is persistently focused on providing superior value and experience for each client relationship. With over 20 years of industry experience serving in leadership roles for both technical groups and project management teams, he has a proven track record of success.

The Importance of Validating Online Voter Respondents

With a little less than a month until the 2020 US presidential election, political polling is in full swing across the country. Phone centers are at or near capacity trying to keep up with political polling demand, and online panel sources are being utilized at a higher frequency for political polling than ever before.

Traditionally pollsters have preferred a phone approach as it allows for a more representative sample base. The abundance of voter profiled phone sample has also made it the preferred methodology for targeting and applying quotas for party registration and previous voter history.

Over the past several years phone has become a more complicated landscape to navigate with increasing regulations and guidelines for how polling is conducted over the phone. In combination with declining response rates, online has now become the preferred method of polling for many.
Online presents a cost-effective alternative to phone, with an abundance of willing participants eager to provide their political opinions. The question is, how accurate are these opinions and how can researchers be assured that those they are speaking to are registered voters with a verifiable voting track record.

In the absence of voter registration data, self-identification has been the preferred method of panelist classification, leading to an inflated number on online research panels. In 2018 there were 153 million+ Americans registered to vote, working out to roughly 47% of the population. By contrast, in a recent poll of online panel members, over 70% had identified themselves as registered voters. In addition to an over inflated voter base, online has traditionally lacked the same segmentation afforded to phone sample. Political party affiliation and previous voter turnout are also self-identified and as such are open to over inflation and bias based on the survey instrument.

Thankfully, several 3rd party voter databases exist that will allow you to proactively match your sample and enhance your panelists voter profile. With the addition of appended voter history and partisanship you can control survey quotas and accurately target registered voters.
Enhancing panelist data with registered voter data creates a methodology truer in form to phone polling and gives you greater confidence in standing behind your online voter respondents data.


About Steve Male, VP Business Development

Portrait of Steve Male VP Business Development at the Logit Group

Steve has over 10 years of market research experience having held roles in project management, field services and client facing roles. Some of Steve’s core areas of focus include the multicultural markets and IT decision makers.

Top Three Research Lessons From Election Season Polling

With the Canadian Federal Election taking place on October 21st and the US Presidential election slated for 2020, it’s a perfect time for us researchers to reflect upon sampling, declining response rates, margins of error, and questionnaire wording for federal election polling surveys.

Those of you who are not researchers or analysts have probably been wondering, how truly representative are election polls, and can they still lend credibility to predicted election results in a world of declining response rates?

Looking back on previous elections and their results, it’s clear that there are important takeaways and learnings from how election polls are conducted.  These takeaways not only ensure that future election work is as representative as possible, but they also lend themselves to takeaways that can be transposed to other research projects.

ballot choice

  1. Ask the right questions to the right audience.

Political polling highlights the importance of asking the right questions. The wording of both the questions and answers will affect the outcome in different ways. For example, here are some considerations:

  • Should you ask respondents for whom they will most likely vote for when the election takes place? Or who they would vote for if the election was held tomorrow?
    • Should your question use the first names of the candidates, as they will appear on the ballots, and/or should you refer to each candidate’s party affiliation?
    • Who are the intended respondents? (All registered voters? All adults of voting age? Anyone intending to vote? Only registered voters who voted in the past election?)

To answer any of these questions, you need to have some clear goals and objectives of why you are conducting the research. There are many types of political polls, and multiple reasons for conducting them. Trying to measure consumer or voter attitudes is different than trying to predict behaviour, which in turn is different from trying to forecast voter turnout.

phone interview

  1. First know the why, then determine which method will get you there.
    Most political polls are subjected to a huge amount of methodological analysis and critique. Was the poll conducted online or by phone? Did the pollster use live interviewers or automated dialing with interactive voice recordings? Was the sample selected through random digit dial (RDD) or targeted listings?

    Questions like these offer insights into the most important methodological challenges facing the research industry in a time of rapid technological and social change. It reminds everyone that the method is so important. The challenges are not just about qualitative versus quantitative or surveys versus focus groups, but also about design, fieldwork, respondent recruitment, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation.

people in rally

  1. Think about the story rather than the numbers.
    Search online for “elections results” and you’ll find a multitude of different polls released on a weekly basis. Most of the results are in alignment with each other, but a handful are notable in their approach because they make the story just as important as the outcomes.

    In those cases, the content is relevant, interest is high, and the stakes are made to feel huge. The story is moving, and it feels like you are one of those individuals they were reporting on. While every poll has the support from PR, marketing, and communication campaigns, it is always nice to see those select few polls that report on things, or from angles, that nobody else has explored yet.

    Conclusion

    When it comes to political polling, the aims and goals are so important that you need to know your approach before you even begin to start thinking about the method and the potential questions. However, once you have your direction, it becomes critical to do more than show the numbers—you must also show the story behind those numbers to make your content relevant and interesting… and to really resonate with your audience.


About Jake

Jake-Pryszlak_avatar_1546770824-400x400 Jake Pryszlak, commonly known as the Research Geek, is a 3-time award-winning market researcher, blogger and speaker. He’s a current Forbes columnist who is active across a plethora of social media channels. His aim is to share his market research knowledge with others in the industry. You can find his blog and social media channels here.

Personalize Your Marketing Campaigns With Voter Profiling

If you use a service like Netflix or Amazon Prime, have you ever questioned its ability to know you well enough to offer up a film or show that you would be interested in watching? It’s something I’ve wondered about—this capability of presenting me with the right thing at the right time. (It often seems particularly prescient whenever I think of unsubscribing, and hooks me for yet another month.)

Speaking of Netflix, if you’ve ever seen an episode of Sherlock, you’ll be familiar with how Mr. Holmes frequently uses cues from people’s appearances to find out more details about their lives. Often, it is creepy how his observations are precisely accurate, as he catches people off guard.  Sherlock_Holmes_in_The_Five_Orange_Pips

Obviously, not everyone is a world-famous detective like Holmes or has the predictive algorithms of Netflix behind them, but there are other ways to understand more about people by looking at their attributes and behaviour. For many years, market research departments have worked on profiling customers and audiences using different segmentation algorithms. Similar techniques are at play when it comes to forecasting the behaviour of voters. Using voter profiling, organizations can accurately predict the wants, needs, and actions of people. This is one of the reasons why there is no one-size-fits-all campaign ad anymore. Based on voters’ behaviour and attitudes toward a range of different worldwide issues and interests, messages can be framed or tailored for specific types of voters.

The Obama, Trump, and Brexit campaigns were all heavily backed by voter data analysis. The team behind the current U.S. president employed voter profiling in 17 states, analyzing the online behaviour of an extraordinary amount of individuals, including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram “likes” as well as smartphone data to segment the public into a number of groups. Imagine looking at the population of 17 states and quickly knowing who liked a specific type of car so you could then send them a personalized message focused on their behaviour and attitudes.

I also think Facebook and other social media platforms lend themselves to “micro-moments.” These are small instances in someone’s journey where they react to something. By liking a page or a comment on Facebook, searching for a particular topic, or purchasing something via an online platform, these moments in time can actually guide a voter’s journey toward a particular candidate. When a member of the public notices an advertisement addressing a local issue or something that resonates with them, this interaction with a candidate becomes the perfect micro-moment.

Using Voter Profiling to Create Marketing Campaigns

Using voter profiling data can help marketing departments and agencies understand when and how micro-moments happen, assisting them in being able to predict when one will occur in the future. In most political campaigns, playing the tactical game is the key to gaining an advantage. You can’t win the majority by focusing efforts across every city and state. By using voter profiling in specified states, you can actually target those undecided voters. (On the other hand, those undecided voters may actually be strong supporters of a particular candidate but are not willing to show their hand.)

Imagine if you could look at voter profile data in real-time, and even examine previous election voting results, to understand how an advertisement performed or created a buzz. This is why I feel voter profiling will actually help from not only this political sense, but also brand perspective. Marketers will be able to harness this data ecosystem to target and predict behaviour in relation to their brand and products.

About the Logit Group

The Logit Group is a leader among data collection firms, and our ongoing commitment has been to develop and administer industry-best technologies as the basis of our research execution. We offer online and offline services including; Global Panel SourcingB2C Phone ResearchMall InterceptsIn-depth interview (IDI) recruitmentFocus group recruitmentcustomized reporting, and more.

For a full list of our services, please visit our website here and to submit a bid request, please see our Bid Request form.

About Jake

Jake-Pryszlak_avatar_1546770824-400x400 Jake Pryslak, commonly known as the Research Geek, is a 3-time award-winning market researcher, blogger and speaker. He’s a current Forbes columnist who is active across a plethora of social media channels. His aim is to share his market research knowledge with others in the industry. You can find his blog and social media channels here.