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There is a strong desire among Canadian residents for an improved level of care in long-term care facilities.

  • A systemic review of long-term care facilities, notably in terms of management and level of staffing, is considered paramount.

 September 2, 2020

With many long-term care facilities across the Country having been severely impacted by COVID-19, Canadian residents were asked to what extent attention needs to be afforded to this area of the health care system.

An overwhelming majority of residents (91%) across the country are looking for a review of the current situation, including nearly two-thirds who believe that changes are needed to ensure a consistent and high level of care is provided at long-term care facilities. This is clearly considered a priority, as opinions are consistent regardless of whether or not respondents have a family member living in a long-term care facility.

The manner in which long-term care facilities are managed is also clearly perceived to be problematic, with nearly all residents (90%) of the opinion that change is needed in that regard. Likewise, increased staffing is generally perceived to be required to address the situation (83% agree).

Those who may have been more closely impacted, directly or indirectly, by the COVID-19 crisis in long-term care facilities voice a stronger desire for change to happen, for a review of management practices and for increased staffing. This includes residents of Quebec, where the situation in publicly-run residences has raised concerns about systemic issues in these facilities. Similarly, females and Boomers (those aged 55 years or older), who are more often known to be natural caregivers, are more likely than males and younger residents to voice a desire for the situation to be assessed and improvements to be made.

It is worth noting that while staffing levels are considered problematic across all provinces, it is less prevalent in the Prairies, where just seven in ten consider this to be a core issue.

About one in seven Canadian residents report having family members living in long-term care facilities. This proportion is highest in the provinces of Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador.

This survey was conducted online August 20-22, 2020, with 1,230 Canadians 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s Canadian Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Canadians to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2016 Census, by gender, age, and region to reflect these population characteristics in each province. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with CRIC Public Opinion Research Standards, a margin of error is not applied.

This is the first of three research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Canadians’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

The pandemic has given many Americans the opportunity to enjoy more quality time with family, cook, bake & relax more than usual.

August 31, 2020

While there have been many negative consequences of the overall pandemic experience, there are some positive outcomes that most Americans have experienced during this period of time.

With home isolation and social distancing in place, most Americans have been afforded the opportunity to undertake activities to a greater extent than is the case during their normal routine. Indeed, during the pandemic most have been able to spend more quality time with their families, bake and cook more than usual, relax more than usual, and read more than usual. Meanwhile, one-half have been able to sleep more than usual, while nearly one-half have been able to exercise more than they usually do. It is also positive to note that four in ten Americans report developing a new friendship or deepening an existing one.

Across the country, results are generally consistent. There are, however, some interesting differences across demographics. Those under the age of 55 are much more likely to note being able to spend more time with family, perhaps related to the fact that residents in this age category are ‘empty nesters’. Younger residents are also more likely to note developing a new friendship or deepening an existing one. Across all of the measured positive outcomes, higher income earners are more likely to have experienced each of them. Differences across education levels are also apparent, as residents with higher levels of education are more likely to have experienced being able to exercise and read more than normal.

This survey was conducted online July 29-31, 2020, with 1,000 Americans 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s American Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Americans to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2010 Census, by gender and age to reflect these population characteristics for the country as a whole. Results are also reflective of the country across regions. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with industry standards, a margin of error is not applied.

This is the fourth of four research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Americans’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

In the coming weeks & months Americans are unlikely to undertake activities beyond their job or visiting the dentist.

• Americans are most likely to go to work in-person, if possible, and shop in-person for non-essential items, in the coming weeks and months. By contrast, only a quarter or fewer Americans are likely to take a flight or take a taxi, Uber, or Lyft.
• Although there is some uncertainty around what it would take for people to be more likely to undertake certain activities in the coming months, having strict cleaning procedures, having a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their state, strict social distancing, and having a vaccine available are all themes of importance.

August 31, 2020

LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING KEY ACTIVITIES IN THE COMING WEEKS AND MONTHS
Given the impact COVID-19 has had on routine in-person activities, Americans were asked their likelihood of undertaking a series of activities in the coming weeks and months, if possible. Results show that residents are generally not likely to go out for many activities. Nearly half would go to work in-person (46%), while a similar four in ten indicated they would be likely to visit the dentist for a routine cleaning/ procedure (41%), one-quarter would send their children to school (25%), and one-quarter would visit a physiotherapist or chiropractor (23%). Americans indicated that given the opportunity, they would be less likely to take a flight (20%) or take a taxi/Uber/Lyft (19%).

Perhaps not surprisingly, likelihood of going to work is higher among those under the age of 55, while it is also elevated among those that earn more each year, and those who have higher education. The same is true for activities like visiting a dentist, as those with higher incomes and education are more likely to partake. Across regions, residents are fairly consistent in their opinions on likelihood of undertaking activities.

WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO MAKE UNDERTAKING THESE KEY ACTIVITIES MORE LIKELY
Americans with a low likelihood of undertaking any of these activities were asked what would make them more likely to do so. Results show that there is some uncertainty around what it would take to have them feel comfortable, but it will be crucial to have strict cleaning procedures in place, a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 in their state, and in some cases having a vaccine available. Looking at the activities residents are least likely to participate in, four in ten indicate having a vaccine available would increase their likelihood of taking a flight (39%), meanwhile three in ten would be more likely to take a taxi/Uber/Lyft if there were strict cleaning procedures in place (30%), or if their state had a sustained period of no new cases of COVID-19 (30%). Residents would be more likely to go to work if there were strict social distancing at that location (30%), or if there were a vaccine available (30%). Meanwhile, likelihood of visiting a dentist or a physiotherapist/chiropractor, would increase most if there were strict cleaning procedures in place (45% and 34% respectively). Meanwhile, Americans would be more likely to send their children back to school if their state had a sustained period of no new cases of the virus (45%).

LIKELIHOOD OF UNDERTAKING OTHER ACTIVITIES IN THE COMING WEEKS AND MONTHS
Further, Americans were asked how likely they would be to partake in other common activities in their community. Results display that more frequently done activities like shopping in a store for items other than necessities (53%), going for a haircut (43%), eating in a restaurant (37%), and playing the lottery (35%), held moderate likelihood among Americans. Meanwhile, going to the gym (20%), going to a pub/ bar (18%), visiting a casino to gamble (18%), and visiting a spa (17%), are only likely to be done by a small minority each in the coming weeks and months.

WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO MAKE UNDERTAKING THESE OTHER ACTIVITIES MORE LIKELY
Once again, Americans unlikely to undertake these activities were asked what would make them more likely to do so. For activities like shopping and eating in a restaurant, strict social distancing (57% and 59% respectively) is most important, while likelihood of going to the gym will increase most when there is a sustained period of no new cases in their state (40%). Meanwhile, activities like getting a haircut, going to a bar, and visiting a spa, will become more commonplace with strict cleaning procedures (38%, 39%, and 34% respectively).

This is the second of four research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Americans’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This survey was conducted online July 29-31, 2020, with 1,000 Americans 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s American Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Americans to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2010 Census, by gender and age to reflect these population characteristics for the country as a whole. Results are also reflective of the country across regions. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with industry standards, a margin of error is not applied.

This is the first of four research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Americans’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.
Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup
###

For more information, please contact:
Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066 (M), mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca,
OR
Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048 (M), mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca
OR
Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116 (M), sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Americans are not optimistic that a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus will be available to the public before the end of the year.

Once available, only two thirds anticipate that they will personally get the vaccination.

August 31, 2020

With considerable efforts underway to develop and test a vaccination for COVID-19, Americans were asked how confident they are that a vaccine will be available to the public before the end of 2020.

Only one-third of Americans are optimistic that a vaccine will be available before year-end. Opinions are generally consistent across the country.

Some differences in opinion are evident by age, with those 55 or older being least optimistic. Meanwhile, men are notably more optimistic than women, as are higher income earners and those with higher education.

Regardless of when the vaccine is available, Americans were asked how likely they are to personally get the vaccination once it is available. Findings show that two-thirds of residents (67%) are likely to do so, although the commitment to get vaccinated varies.  Approximately four in ten (38%) indicated they will definitely get the vaccine when available, while three in ten (29%) reported that they probably will do so.  Meanwhile, two in ten (21%) either probably or definitely will not get vaccinated, while one in ten (11%) are unsure.

Across the country, intentions are generally consistent, although those in the midwest (61%) express modestly lower likelihood in getting the vaccination once available.

Demographically, likelihood in getting the vaccination decreases with age, while it is notably higher among men, higher income earners, and those with higher education.

This survey was conducted online July 29-31, 2020, with 1,000 Americans 18 years of age or older, from the Logit Group’s American Omnibus. Fielding every month, the Logit Group’s COVID-19 Omnibus surveys Americans to ask their opinions and behaviours related to topical issues. Results were analyzed by Narrative Research. Data was weighted based on the 2010 Census, by gender and age to reflect these population characteristics for the country as a whole. Results are also reflective of the country across regions. As a non-probability sample (i.e., a panel sample where residents have joined a panel to share their opinions), and in accordance with industry standards, a margin of error is not applied.

This is the third of four research summaries that will be provided within the week. Watch for further details on Americans’ perceptions and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Narrative Research (www.narrativeresearch.ca), is a leading public opinion and market research company headquartered in Canada. The company was recently certified as WBE (Women Business Enterprise). As a non-partisan, 100% Canadian-owned research company, Narrative Research is dedicated to providing clients with state-of-the-art research and strategic consulting services.

The Logit Group (https://logitgroup.com/) is a leading North American data collection and market research execution company headquartered in Toronto, conducting large-scale projects for a variety of well-known research agencies and brands. Logit employs industry-best technologies across an array of methodologies, and is independent, experienced and quality-oriented.

Follow us on Twitter at @EveryNarrative and @LogitGroup

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Brigley, CEO, Narrative Research – 902.222.7066, mbrigley@narrativeresearch.ca

OR

Margaret Chapman, COO, Narrative Research – 902.222.4048, mchapman@narrativeresearch.ca

OR

Sam Pisani, Managing Partner, Logit Group – 416.629.4116, sam.pisani@logitgroup.com

Interviewing Hard-to-Reach Respondents During Difficult Times

Interviewing Hard-to-Reach Respondents During Difficult Times
By Arundati Dandapani

Door to door sampling was the truest, recall the veterans, who are still grappling with the challenges of an industry that has fast moved towards automation and programmatic designs. Research reveals that operational efficiency and costs have brought down the overall quality of the respondent experience, leading to a general distrust in the industry. Poor experiences have led to declining participation rates, leading to even lower response and completion rates.

Incidence rate is defined as the number or percentage of qualified people from a sample that are eligible to participate in a study. Since the onset of one of the most disruptive global health crisis in recent decades has changed the way we work, suppliers across the board report no change in IR (ease of finding qualified respondents/targetable population) or Response Rates (completion), and in some cases observing even higher response rates than before. Meeting respondents for specific market research studies however remains an ongoing challenge and difficulty for many reasons.

Are these Difficult Times?

Twelve weeks ago, there was no COVID-19 to talk about. Today, how we are doing business and market research has changed completely owing to the economic, social, and public health impacts of the current global pandemic.

“In times of COVID-19, we need to be hyper-sensitive on user experience as everyone has heightened emotions. When we poll our audience about ‘what questions do you have today’, Covid related questions are becoming major top of mind questions,” said Paul Neto of Measure Protocol. Rand Market Research confirms that nearly 80% of Canadians are concerned about the Coronavirus and are changing their behaviour due to it. “While many companies focus on Incidence Rates, the critical metric is its conversion to completion rates, as in many cases (70-90% of all surveys), participants do not complete them because of poor experiences. The industry has moved away from responsible interaction with the participant,” reminded Neto.

Jackie Lorch of Dynata wrote that, “Consumers can still provide generalizable data and think objectively about their cars, TVs, household goods and other products and services, but their answers on many topics will be different while the Coronavirus crisis lasts. This reflects the reality of your customers’ experience. It is more vital than ever to keep in touch with them and not risk being left with a data “black hole” as the world recovers.”

Business as Usual Despite the Crisis

The major reported or observed change in research operations has been in the shifting of real-person fieldwork to virtual operations, affecting offline qualitative work the most (including face-to-face interviews, and focus groups). The best way to measure change is by tracking respondents over time, for example, comparing the IR in studies in the last month with the past three months of studies in field.

Whether times are good or bad, maintaining respondent interest can be a challenge for many reasons. Factors range from the source of sample (e.g., banks that use highly targeted client lists for surveys seeing higher participation), mode of survey (online is a better medium for some demographics, and has little barriers for use in difficult times like COVID-19), quality of profilers (the rarer the qualifications or behaviours, the feasibility of that sample is lower) among others.

While there are different reasons for low respondent participation, panel participation is often dependent on how the survey question is worded, and what the qualification times and windows are. Qualification includes the criteria that respondents are required to fulfill at the recruiting stage, and qualification times and windows often determine how tracking studies will be impacted, opening unique opportunities to benchmark and observe targeted respondent behaviour over time.

The potential of mode must not be overlooked. According to Randa Bell of ASDE Survey Sampler, “IVR (interactive Voice Response) presents an interesting opportunity to reach respondents in a cheaper or faster way than traditional telephone surveys, when your interviewing capacity is lowered due to physical distancing in call centers. Also, there’s the added ability to reach cell phones via IVR or SMS text messages to the younger age groups who might be sitting at home and bored with all the news and lock-down. All surveys at these times should be introduced knowing that COVID-19 is on the minds of everyone and acknowledged in the introduction.”

Doing More to Earn Respondent Trust and Retention

Businesses need to keep conducting mitigation tests to check that their field studies are on track to optimize their incidence rates. The qualifications for studies and project timelines must reflect the new reality and new needs, whether that means keeping a close tab on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, and being adaptive in response as governments and citizens work to contain the outbreak, or introducing new measures that protect the public and companies investment in the ongoing health of their respondents.

Incidence rates are reflective of the effort it takes to convert qualified persons to participate in a study. Research fieldwork and data collection methods must be adaptive to create better experiences that improve participation rates. If that in the current environment means substituting / migrating all face-to-face qualitative work with other user-friendly virtual, mobile and safe alternatives, businesses must prepare. Targeting lists and respondents effectively involves employing the optimal mix of traditional and new technologies including AI, the internet of things and blockchain to ensure user-intuitive experiences that convert to the highest participation of qualified respondents.


About Arundati

Arundati Arundati Dandapani, CMRP (@itadnura) advises non-profits and businesses with insights and storytelling. She is the founder of Generation1.ca, an online cross-sectoral resource and outlet for Canada’s newest residents, chief editor of MRIA-ARIM, and has been honoured with industry awards like the inaugural GRIT Future List Honour along with the 2020 AAPOR Burns Bud Roper Fellow and QRCA’s 2020 Young Professionals Grant. She can be reached at arundati@generation1.ca.

Top 5 Market Research Predictions for 2020

Top 5 Market Research Predictions for 2020

This is the time of year when everybody seems to be making predictions. Within the realm of market research, I’ve seen quite a few articles forecasting methodologies and the impact of data privacy. From my own experience, here are five trends or changes the industry will experience in 2020.

1. Outcome- and strategy-first methodologies will be embraced.
In the coming year, business outcomes from research and insight will become even more important to drive results and profit from the data gathered. Success will be achieved through the increased integration of people, data, and technology. The combination of different data sources should enable businesses to move from insight-driven to result-driven, enabling the insight team to be one of the most important functions. For this to work in 2020, we need curious individuals who can answer the “why” question, working hand in hand with best-practice technology solutions.

2. DIY research will come into its own.
With so many start-ups and small to medium-sized businesses, there seems to be even more use cases for “do it yourself” research. Companies like SurveyMonkey, Typeform, and Zappi offer a DIY research format, allowing individuals to create their own research program without needing to discuss anything with an actual person or agency. For 2020 to be the year for DIY research, though, there must be more go-to-guides and information to help individuals conduct market research by themselves.

3. Unlocking privacy compliance will be key.
Yes, this one is probably on every prediction list over the last few years, but there’s a reason for it. Data privacy continues to be a big deal, and we are just beginning to feel the impact of the various global legislative initiatives that relate to this topic. As I like to say: “The bigger the company, the bigger the threat.”

At the moment, there seems to be no standard way of working with privacy-related requirements—different businesses are seeking different solutions for the variety of compliance issues. In 2020, I firmly believe we will see standard protocols emerge that will lead us to a less-fragmented market (and less-fragmented privacy rules, in general). However, the real value will be seen by organizations that look for ways to address compliance needs while also unlocking new potential value for data stakeholders.

4. Data science will overtake insights.
Market research has historically focused on data collection, and analysis has typically been simple. This applies to qualitative as well. In some ways, however, the market research industry was ahead of its time—the ability of decision-makers to use data to guide their decisions has lagged the capacity to collect it.

Now that the data industry is much larger, you could argue that market research is being absorbed into data science. There are huge amounts of programmers and software developers in our industry—while many are adept at selling, they know little about marketing or research. (To be fair, they usually do not refer to themselves as “marketing researchers.”)

For market research to be the golden industry, we have to go beyond mechanical data collection, simple analysis, and interpretation. Instead, we must work closely with AI, machine learning, and data scientists. However, I still feel that a market researcher with sound experience will still have an amazing career in the industry. Those able to design primary quantitative research who have a good grasp of statistics—as well as marketing and business in general—will be at an advantage, as will top-notch qualitative researchers.

5. We will reach peak innovation.
Innovation is a word I hear a lot, but it can sometime feel like people are only saying it because it’s a great marketing buzz term that makes you sound amazing and at the top of your game. The desire for market research agencies and boutiques to pump out faster and more reactive products has never been so strong. In 2020, I feel like we may well reach peak innovation, but the technology that is available today will continue to get better. This means new tools will be able to deliver timely insights that provide business results and outcome-first approaches to market research and data.

Conclusion
Overall, I feel that outcome-first methodologies will come out on top while the inclusion of DIY research will become prominent in the sector, especially for small and medium-sized businesses. Better yet, I feel like the industry hasn’t reached its summit. While it might have peaked in terms of innovation, it can still grow and improve with respect to the value it adds.

While January is a time for predictions, it’s also a time for resolutions. There are many people who still don’t see the value of market research, so I challenge you to set a goal for this year—go and change one person’s opinion of this important sector. If all those reading this can do that, our field will be off to a great 2020. Have a great year!

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About Jake

Jake-Pryszlak_avatar_1546770824-400x400  

Jake Pryszlak, commonly known as the Research Geek, is a 3-time award-winning market researcher, blogger and speaker. He’s a current Forbes columnist who is active across a plethora of social media channels. His aim is to share his market research knowledge with others in the industry. You can find his blog and social media channels here.

The Importance of a Blended Methodology

Everyone thinks you need a certain personality to be a market researcher, but you don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes for a successful career in this field. Of course, some skill in observation and investigation—and a keen interest in people—can certainly go a long way.

Many people can get a bit lost when it comes to choosing which research methodology to use between qualitative and quantitative strategies. In some cases, blending the two can be a good approach. However, it’s important to know when and how this works in the real world.

While blended research is neither new nor extraordinary, it is often overlooked when designing a research study because clients are requiring cost-effective research conducted 24/7. However, one of the appeals of a blended methodology is that it can help triangulate our measurement strategy, using different measures of the same concept to provide a more robust overall sense of understanding.

But what if the results are not consistent?

One of the major challenges for using a blended methodology is the different types of expertise required. Most social researchers can manage adding some qualitative questions to a primarily quantitative survey, or can collect some quantitative indicators in a qualitative project and then analyze the results. That said, given the time and training required to develop advanced expertise in ethnography, in-depth interviewing, survey research, statistical analysis, or any advanced method, most researchers are going to specialize.

different researchers

This means developing a strong blended methodology often demands collaboration of different researchers with different types of expertise. It requires more time and more attention to project design and management than may be necessary in a single-method project. Researchers with different methodological commitments may also have different research philosophies—potentially making collaboration more challenging.

Overall, it doesn’t actually matter if you choose quantitative or qualitative research or a blend of the two. The most important questions to answer are why are you conducting market research and what would you like to understand? Then, you can create a research study that answers your questions while putting the audience at the heart of it all.

It’s important to mention that whichever methodology you pick, blended or not, good research needs excellent recruitment. Being successful means never forgetting that the respondents you recruit are people first and participants second.

Depending on your methodology and techniques, you should go and visit the respondent in person. You will see where and how they live and observe their environment and habits, while getting to know them better. Even more importantly, the respondent meets you, too. This builds trust and respect for each other and your research—two items even more important than being Sherlock Holmes.


About Jake

Jake-Pryszlak_avatar_1546770824-400x400  Jake Pryszlak, commonly known as the Research Geek, is a 3-time award-winning market researcher, blogger and speaker. He’s a current Forbes columnist who is active across a plethora of social media channels. His aim is to share his market research knowledge with others in the industry. You can find his blog and social media channels here.